Zoosk was reportedly the first major dating site to offer photo verification

Zoosk was reportedly the first major dating site to offer photo verification

Privacy

If you sign up to Zoosk and give the site access to one of your social media profiles, such as Twitter or Facebook, they may make posts on your behalf on that platform, and they may also gather information about your friends.

Think twice about giving Zoosk access to your address book – they keep your contacts on file and may later use your information to suggest friends and connections to other members. If they invite your friends, they may out you as being a Zoosk user by extending the invitation on your behalf. (While there’s no shame in dating online, you might not want it advertised to your nearest and dearest.) By signing up to Zoosk, you grant permission for all your user content to be used for purposes including advertising or transmission to a third party.

All photos are reviewed by moderators: users can verify their profile pictures by taking a video selfie that moderators compare with your profile picture to make sure it really looks like you. You can tell which pictures have been verified as they’ll have a green tick. A Zoosk representative told us that verified photos get up to 200% more views and 100% more messages than the average.

Finding love on Facebook

Facebook Dating officially launched in the US in and is currently available in 19 other countries, although there is currently no date set for its arrival to Australia. Users of Facebook Dating are able to create a dating profile that is separate from their Facebook profile and potential matches are recommended based on preferences, shared interests, Facebook activity and mutual friends.

You’re also able to discover other singles that share similar interests through groups or events. Your friends and family aren’t able to see what you do with your dating profile, and you can’t be matched with your friends unless you use the Secret Crush feature and you both add each other to your list.

Given how many of us use Facebook, the convenience of an embedded dating app will most likely trump users’ concerns about privacy

After the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook users might be understandably wary of sharing personal information in the Facebook app – especially particularly sensitive information that you might share in the course of getting to know someone. But given how many of us use Facebook, the convenience of an embedded dating app will most likely trump users’ concerns about privacy. We’ll be watching this closely!

Online dating case studies

We asked a range of people to tell us about their experiences with online dating, including how long they’ve been on the app, their successes, their challenges, and which app worked for them.

User: Victoria, 44.

Verdict: «I think they are actually a brilliant way to meet and connect with people you wouldn’t usually. It’s great to keep chatting on the app [or site] until you’re sure of a connection and then you can transfer to [phone] and then in person.»

Recommendations: «I find Tinder is the easiest site to use but you do have to dig further to find quality. I have also had success with Bumble and Happn. When I started online dating I used RSVP and found it good at the time, but Tinder just made it all so much easier and faster – which has good and bad points.»

Success? At least 20 friendships and relationships over the past decade. She still keeps in contact with many of them.

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Tips? Ask the right questions to establish someone’s identity – where they work and what suburb they live in, for example.